Witness Nails the White House, DoJ in U.S. Attorney Political Firings

23 de may de 2007

<body><div id="article"><tr><td height="28" valign="middle" width="184"></td><td valign="middle" width="185"></td></tr><h1>Witness Nails the White House, DoJ in U.S. Attorney Political Firings</h1><p>Washington, D.C., May 23 (LPAC)--Monica Goodling, the former White House liaison for the Department of Justice, testified today that the White House had signed off on the firings of U.S. Attorneys, and that both the Deputy Attorney General and the Attorney General himself had given false testimony to Congress.</p><p>And Goodling, a 33-year old member of the right-wing Federalist Society, testified that "I know I crossed the line" in using political criteria in the hiring of DOJ civil service personnel, while hastening to add that she had not "intentionally" violated the law. Before acknowledging this, Goodling had admitted that she had attempted to block the hiring of one prosecutor because his resume indicated he was a liberal Democrat.</p><p>At the outset of her testimony before the House Judiciary Committee, Goodling unloaded on former Deputy Attorney General Paul McNulty, who had blamed her for withholding information from him, which, he claimed, led him to give misleading testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee. "That allegation is false," she testified. "I did not withhold information from the Deputy."</p><p>She went on to say that McNulty's Senate testimony "was incomplete or inaccurate in a number of respects," and that "he was not fully candid about his knowledge of White House involvement" in the firing of the federal prosecutors, and she then identified three additional areas in which McNulty's testimony had been false.</p><p>Goodling also testified that McNulty didn't fully reveal what he knew about the role of the White House in the firings, because "he was aware that the [Justice] Department had worked for at least several months with the White House, and that many offices in the White House had signed off" on the firings, and beyond this, that people in the White House were "participating and making phone calls and different sort of things."</p><p>Rep. Artur Davis (D-AL), who has introduced a resolution of no-confidence against Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, elicited from Goodling that she believes that Gonzales gave inaccurate testimony when he said: that he had never seen a list of the U.S. Attorneys to be fired; that he had never been brief on the list; and that he had never been involved in discussions about the U.S. Attorney firings.</p></div></body>